EAL Post-Primary Assessment Kit

 

Table of Contents

Foreword
Introduction
Administration of assessment tasks
Scoring and rating
Initial interview assessment
Recording placement and progress assessment
Student assessment profile

Test Sets

Placement tests
Set 2 tests
Set 3 tests
Appendix i
Appendix ii

Foreword

The tests of English language proficiency presented in this book were developed by Integrate Ireland Language and Training (IILT), (David Little, Barbara Lazenby Simpson, Bronagh Finnegan Catibusic) with the help of language support teachers working in post-primary schools around the country.

The tests are based on the first three levels of the Council of Europe’s Common European Framework of Reference for Languages which correspond to the three proficiency levels (1, 2 and 3) used by the Department of Education and Science. In designing the tests every effort has been made to select tasks that students encounter regularly in their language support classes and to design scoring procedures that will achieve accurate results provided the tests are administered strictly according to the instructions provided.

Draft tests were presented at in-service seminars for post-primary language support teachers as follows: speaking and writing in autumn 2004, reading in spring 2005, listening in autumn 2005. Each set of tests was piloted by language support teachers working in different parts of the country. Feedback indicated that the tests were easy to administer and elicited an accurate representation of students’ English language proficiency. At the end of the piloting process the tests were revised on the basis of student performance and detailed feedback from teachers. A report on the piloting process was presented to the Department of Education and Science.

We acknowledge with gratitude the role played by language support teachers in the development of the tests. The feedback they gave us at in-service seminars and especially via the piloting process played a crucial role in determining the final form of the tests.

We are also grateful to the following for permission to reproduce copyright material: Ashton School, Cork; Bandon Grammar School, Co. Cork; Boherbue Comprehensive School, Co. Cork; Cabinteely Community School; Carrick Vocational School, Co. Donegal; Carrigaline Community School; Coláiste Muire, Ennis, Co. Clare; The Irish Association of Youth Orchestras; John Kelly, The Clare Champion; Kildare Presentation Secondary School; The King’s Hospital School; Meánscoil Iognáid Rís, Dublin; Moyne Community School, Co. Longford; O’Connnell Secondary School, Dublin.

David Little, Barbara Lazenby Simpson, Bronagh Finnegan Catibusic

Introduction

Four skills

As language proficiency for educational purposes is dependent on the appropriate development of four separate skills – listening, speaking, reading and writing –assessment should be carried out for each skill.

Assessment should take into consideration the capabilities of the peer group of native English-speaking students and be appropriate to age and year groupings.

Scoring and Rating

A grid is provided at the end of each test for scoring and rating students. All rating is carried out in relation to the first three levels of the Common Europe Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) of the Council of Europe (see www.coe.int/lang). These three CEFR levels have been articulated for post-primary learners of English as an Additional Language in Irish schools and may be seen in full on pages 166-7.

The lowest level is A1 and, for newly arrived students with no existing English language proficiency, this level becomes the first teaching/learning target.

The highest level used in the language support programme is B1. When students are capable of performing in the assessment tasks at this level, and of achieving the scores indicated, then their full integration into mainstream learning is possible.

The levels A1, A2 and B1 reflect the first three levels of the six-point scale of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. The three levels of proficiency indicated in the Department of Education and Science Circular 053/07 relate to these levels.

In order to achieve an accurate assessment of a student’s ability, each level has been divided into three sub-levels. These three levels reflect the concept of the student’s ability to perform a particular task – with a lot of help, with a little help, and with no help.

Student profile

Student assessment profile

A sheet is provided for the development of an individual student profile of proficiency in English.It is inevitable that progress will be made at different rates across the four skills. This sheet allows for successive assessments to be recorded and for progress and achievement relative to the different skills to be immediately apparent.

Assessment tasks

All assessment tasks are derived from typical classroom activities, therefore it is not necessary to introduce an assessment activity as a test, if it is felt that this will cause undue concern to students.

Using the levels

All sets begin at level A1 and continue to level B1. It is suggested that a student should begin with A1 and continue until he/she is unable to complete a test sheet. The teacher should avoid continuing with the test as soon as it becomes clear that the student is experiencing difficulty proceeding.

At a later stage, it is suggested that the language support teacher, with knowledge of a student’s abilities, may decide to begin the assessment at a higher level. For example, it would be appropriate to continue testing at the point at which a student ended on the previous occasion.

If for some reason a student’s proficiency has dropped in the interim, due to absence from school, return to his/her home country etc., it may be necessary to lower the starting point of the assessment.

Introducing new activities under test conditions

If it is thought that a particular task or process in assessment is unfamiliar to a student and may cause additional uncertainty, it is recommended that the teacher introduce this in advance.

For example, if a teacher decides to record the assessment of ‘speaking’ in order to score the student’s performance afterwards, it may be necessary to introduce the use of a recording device to the class in advance.

Timing

Strict timing has not been indicated on any tests.

The recordings for testing Listening will inevitably dictate the time required for these tests.

For Speaking, Reading and Writing it is appropriate that the teacher administering the tests should judge the matter of timing in relation to the ages and levels of proficiency of students.

Providing assistance to students

It is important to ensure that students understand fully what they are expected to do. Teachers should use the sample answer which is provided in every test (apart from Speaking tests) to point out what should be done, for example circle a word, draw a line, complete a text and so on.

No other assistance should be provided.

Ending the test

It will be clear when a student is unable to continue a test and it is appropriate to end the test at that point.

Monitoring and recording students’ progress

An individual file for each student should be maintained by the Language Support Teacher to include all assessments, scoring sheets and student assessment profiles. Samples of students’ written work should also be maintained on files and dated accordingly.

Meeting the needs of post-primary students

The tests reflect the real needs of post-primary students in meeting the challenge of engaging with mainstream subject learning. The focus of the tests, therefore, is on the English language necessary for engagement with mainstream classroom learning and for socialization in the school.

The tests are intended for use across both junior and senior cycles.

Administration of assessment tasks

The tests are located in the pack as shown below.

PlacementPage 17
Set 2Page 65
Set 3Page 113

For all LISTENING assessments

  • Before starting the recording, the teacher should indicate the sample answer, on the relevant answer sheet, and ensure that students understand what they are expected to do e.g. draw a line, insert a number, insert a tick, or circle.
  • As the recording begins, the teacher should again indicate the sample answer in response to the sample question.
  • Students must not be given any further assistance during the test.

For all SPEAKING assessments

  • All tests of speaking are based on pictures.
  • The question prompts for teachers are provided as an integral part of the test.
  • Teachers should restrict interaction to the prompts provided.
  • It is important that the teacher familiarises him/herself with the descriptors contained in the grid at the top of each test in advance of administering the test.
  • If a teacher feels uncertain about carrying out the test while scoring the student’s performance at the same time, it would be appropriate, where possible, to use the assistance of another teacher, or to record the test for scoring afterwards.

For all READING assessments

  • The instructions for each task are indicated on the assessment sheet.
  • An example is provided on each sheet.
  • If necessary, teachers may provide support (non-verbal or verbal) in order to ensure that pupils understand fully the requirements of each stage. For example, the teacher may hold up a test sheet and indicate the sample answer.
  • No additional help should be given as the purpose of the test is to determine the student’s ability to read the assessment tasks.

For all WRITING assessments

  • Assessment at levels A1 and A2 is based on picture prompts. Level B1 assessment requires free writing.
  • An example is provided on each sheet of the level A1 and A2 tests.
  • If necessary, teachers may provide support (non-verbal or verbal) in order to ensure that pupils understand fully the requirements of each stage. For example, the teacher may hold up a test sheet, indicate the sample answer and indicate that the pupil should write his/her answers on the blank lines provided.
  • Students must not be given any further assistance during the test.

In all cases, the teacher may end the test when it is evident that a student is no longer able to continue.

Scoring and Rating

Listening and Reading

All listening and reading tests present six questions.

In every case, the first question is an example.

The remaining five answers are scored with 1 point each.

At each level A1, A2 and B1

15 answers in total, equalling 15 points per level.

Rating the performance of a student:

Student’s total score at any one level

Student’s proficiency

(level of test)

The next stage
0 – 7

A1.1 or

A2.1 or

B1.1

Continue at this level.
8 – 12

A1.2 or

A2.2 or

B1.2

Continue at this level.
13 – 15

A1.3 or

A2.3

Progress to the next level –

from A1 to A2 or from A2 to B1.

13 – 15B1.3

Student has reached the objective of language support.

When this has been reached for all four skills, the student is ready for full integration into the mainstream.

Speaking

Scoring is carried out simultaneously during the tests of speaking. Alternately, the test may be recorded for later scoring.

Each question in the speaking tests is made up of a number of sub-questions, or prompts. The student is scored on his/her overall performance in the set of sub-questions. This allows for more accurate assessment as the student is not marked down by failure to know a single word.

4 sub-questions or prompts

Example:

Question 5. Now think about our school.

What is the name of our school?

Tell me one thing about the room that you are in now.

Tell me one thing that you like to do at school.

Level A1

Assessment is carried out in relation to Vocabulary and Pronunciation only:

Category of competenceA1.1 = 1 pointA1.2 = 2 pointsA1.3 = 3 points
Vocabulary

Seems to recognize what is being pointed at.

Does not always produce the correct word/phrase.

May require assistance if production is not forthcoming or choice of vocabulary is difficult to understand.

Recognises what is being pointed at.

May produce a word/phrase that is less than fully correct.

Recognizes what is being pointed at.

Produces the correct word/phrase.

Pronunciation

Pronunciation is very difficult to understand without reference to the picture prompt.

May require assistance if production is unintelligible.

Pronunciation is recognizable without reference to the picture prompt.

Pronunciation less than fully correct.

Pronunciation is correct, though it may be strongly coloured by the pupil’s first language.

Example of scoring grid for A1 (teacher entersv):

 

A1.1

1 point

A1.2

2 points

A1.3

3 points

Vocabularyv  
Pronunciation v 

Maximum of 30 points at level A1.

Rating students’ performance:

Student ’s total scoreLevelThe next stage
1-14A1.1Continue at this level.
15 -25A1.2Continue at this level.
26 - 30A1.3Progress to level A2.

At Levels A2 and B1 assessment includes Vocabulary, Grammar and Pronunciation.

Level A2

Category of competenceA2.1 = 1 pointA2.2 = 2 pointsA2.3 = 3 points
Vocabulary

Produces some of the required items of vocabulary.

May have difficulty remembering words.

May require assistance if choice of vocabulary is difficult to understand.

Produces most of the required items of vocabulary.

Only occasional difficulty.

May make some errors.

Produces all the required items of vocabulary without difficulty or serious error.
Grammar

Can produce structured phrases and simple sentences, but hesitantly and with obvious errors.

May require assistance if production is not forthcoming or if the structure produced is difficult to understand.

Can produce structured phrases and simple sentences without hesitation but with some errors.Can produce structured phrases and sentences without hesitation or serious error.
Pronunciation

Pronunciation is only partly accurate.

Phrases/ sentences are often difficult to understand.

May require assistance if aspects of production are unintelligible.

Pronunciation is mostly accurate and phrases/ sentences are only occasionally difficult to understand.

Pronunciation is accurate and phrases/ sentences are easily understood.

The accent may still be markedly “foreign”.

Level B1

Category of competenceB1.1 = 1 pointB1.2 = 2 pointsB1.3 = 3 points
Vocabulary

Uses mostly familiar vocabulary learnt in class.

Occasionally has difficulty remembering a word or phrase.

May require assistance if choice of vocabulary is difficult to understand.

Can go beyond familiar vocabulary learnt in class.

Rarely has difficulty remembering a word or phrase.

Frequently goes beyond vocabulary learnt in class.

Uses relevant vocabulary with ease and confidence.

Grammar

Uses appropriate sentence-length structures.

Still makes errors and may be hesitant.

May require assistance if no response is forthcoming or if the structure produced is difficult to understand.

Uses appropriate sentence-length structures fluently but not always accurately.

Meaning is clear despite errors.

Uses appropriate sentence-length structures fluently, with confidence, and mostly accurately.
Pronunciation

Pronunciation of individual words sometimes inaccurate and intonation sometimes difficult to understand.

May require assistance if aspects of production are unintelligible.

Pronunciation of individual words generally accurate.

Intonation may occasionally be difficult to understand.

Pronunciation of individual words generally accurate and intonation easy to understand.

There may still be strong traces of a “foreign” accent.

Example of scoring grid for A2 and B1 (teacher enters v):

 

A2.1

1 point

A2.2

2 points

A2.3

3 points

Vocabulary v 
Grammar v 
Pronunciation  v

Maximum of 45 points at levels A2 and B1.

Rating students’ performance:

Student’s total scoreLevelThe next stage
1 - 22

A2.1 or

B1.1

Continue at this level.
23 - 38

A2.2 or

B1.2

Continue at this level.
39 - 45A2.3Progress to level B1.
39 - 45B1.3

Student has reached the objective of language support.

When this has been reached for all four skills, the student is ready for full integration into the mainstream.

Writing

The writing assessment is as follows:

Level A1

Test contains 9 single word items with a word bank provided on the answer page.

Example of scoring grid for A1 (teacher entersv):

 Vocabulary incorrect

Vocabulary correct

Spelling inaccurate

Vocabulary correct

Spelling accurate

Point012
Mathematics v 
English  v
etc.  v
TOTAL scores 14
Overall TOTAL 5 

Maximum of 18 points at level A1.

Rating students’ performance:

Student’s total scoreLevelThe next stage
0 - 8A1.1Continue at this level.
9 - 15A1.2Continue at this level.
16 - 18A1.3Progress to level A2.

Level A2(i)

A2(i) Completing words in six sentences.

Example of scoring grid for A2(i) (teacher enters v):

  Word correctSpelling correct
SentencePoints½½
2has  
2of  
2interesting  

Maximum of 21 points at level A2 (i)

Rating students’ performance:

Student’s total scoreLevelThe next stage
0 - 9A2.1Continue at this level.
10 - 18A2.2Continue at this level.
19 - 21A2.3Progress to level B1

A2 (ii) Completing six sentences on the basis of picture prompts.

Descriptors for Writing are used to determine proficiency.

Points are awarded for vocabulary, grammar and handwriting (including spelling and punctuation).

Category of competenceA2.2 = 1 pointA2.3 = 2 points
Vocabulary

Can recognize and reproduce most items of basic vocabulary associated with school subjects and activities.

Rarely has difficulty remembering words and begins to work with an increasing range of vocabulary.

Can recognize and reproduce all items of basic vocabulary associated with school subjects and activities.

Has no difficulty remembering words and works confidently with an increasing range of vocabulary.

GrammarCan structure sentences from a picture prompt, but with occasional errors in word order.Can structure sentences from a picture or other prompt with accuracy.
Handwriting, spelling and punctuationCan write words accurately. Punctuation is mostly accurate.Can write words accurately and write short sentences with correct spelling and appropriate capitalization and punctuation.

Put score (1 or 2) in relevant box for each sentence.

Required response: The pupil uses familiar vocabulary to construct a short, well-formed, orthographically accurate sentence, based on a picture prompt.

Sample responses are provided in the Correction Key for each test.

SentenceRating
VocabularyGrammarHandwriting, spelling and punctuation
2   
3   
4   

Maximum of 36 points at Level A2 (ii)

Student’s total scoreLevelThe next stage
1 - 28A2.2Continue at this level.
29-36A2.3Progress to level B1.

Level B1

Scoring of free writing is based on the descriptors for Writing below:

Category of competenceB1.1 = 1 pointB1.2 = 2 pointsB1.3 = 3 points
Vocabulary

Can use a small amount of vocabulary additional to basic items.

Does not yet combine and extend vocabulary in free writing.

Can use an increasing amount of vocabulary additional to basic items.

Begins to combine and extend vocabulary in free writing.

Can use a lot of vocabulary additional to basic items.

Confidently combines and extends vocabulary in free writing.

GrammarUses a small range of grammatical structures makes errors but can sometimes correct them when they are pointed out.

Uses an increasing range of grammatical structures with growing control of tenses, pronouns, prepositions, word order, etc.

Errors remain in some areas.

Uses a wide range of grammatical structures with confidence and control.

Errors generally confined to attempts to use new or unfamiliar patterns.

Handwriting, spelling and punctuationCan write short connected sentences, but spelling and punctuation are inaccurate.Can write short connected sentences with minor errors of layout, punctuation and capitals.Can write short connected sentences with generally accurate layout, punctuation and capitals.

Example of scoring free writing.

Teacher enters v

Category of competence

B1.1

1 point

B1.2

2 points

B1.3

3 points

Vocabulary v 
Grammar v 
Handwriting, spelling and punctuation  v
Overall TOTAL7

Maximum of 9 points at level B1.

Rating students’ performance:

Student’s total scoreLevelThe next stage
1 - 4B1.1Continue at this level.
5 - 7B1.2Continue at this level.
8 - 9B1.3

Student has reached the objective of language support.

When this has been reached for all four skills, the student is ready for full integration into the mainstream.

Initial interview assessment for new students

On the following page there is a set of questions for initial interview assessment of a new student. An interpretation of this assessment is provided below.

The purpose of this interview is to gain an initial view of a student’s proficiency in Listening and Speaking. A more detailed assessment of language proficiency will be conducted following a settling-down period.

The interpretation provided allows the student’s early performance to be rated at A1, A2 and B1. In the case that there appears to be a complete absence of any English language proficiency, the grade 0 (zero) may be applied.

The levels A1, A2 and B1 may be equated to Levels 1,2 and 3 as applied by the Department of Education and Science.

Level 1/Level A1Level 2/Level A2Level 3/Level B1
Very poor comprehension of English and very limited spoken English.Understands some English and can speak English sufficiently well for basic communication.Has competent communication skills in English.

Rating and grading for initial interview assessment

PerformanceInterpretationAction

Questions 1-6

No real response

Has little or no English language proficiency.First learning target is Level A1 in the Language Proficiency Benchmarks.
May be overwhelmed/shy.Observe the student over the following weeks.

Questions 1-6

Responses to some or all questions

Some level of proficiency at least to A1 level. More rigorous assessment after ‘settling down’ will clarify this.Work at A1 level and observe the student’s performance in different skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking.

Questions 7 -13

Student understands the question but responds inaccurately

Some level of proficiency at A2 level. More rigorous assessment later.Work at A1 /A2 level and monitor the student’s performance in different skills.

Questions 7 -13

Student understands the questions and responds with general accuracy.

Proficiency in spoken interaction in the A2/B1 range. Further assessment required later.Work at A2/B1 level and monitor the student’s performance in different skills.
  • It is important to remember that language proficiency will generally not be consistent at the same level across all language skills and different thematic areas. Learning objectives should be set in accordance with observed individual strengths and weaknesses.
  • It should also be noted that it may be difficult to obtain a clear view of a student’s proficiency at an initial interview. Many factors can influence performance including strangeness, shyness, fear, etc.

Initial interview assessment for new students

v appropriate box as interview proceeds

* response may not be accurate but indicates a reasonable level of comprehension

YEAR/CLASS___________________ NAME_______________________________

  No responseSome comprehension but unsure responseResponse indicating comprehension*
1.What is your name?   
2.What is your age?   
3.What language do you speak at home?   
4.Where do you live?   
5.Have you got brothers and sisters?   
6.What hobbies or sports do you like?   
Only proceed to 7 if the student has answered some or all of questions 1 – 6.
7.How did you come to school today?   
8.Did you go to school in another place? Where?   
9.Tell me about your last school.   
10.What was your best subject?   
11.What did you not like in school?   
12.What will you do after school today?   
13.What would you like to do when you finish school?   

Recording placement and progress assessment

Name of student :

Year and class:

Date(s) of assessment :

Enter assessment set used (Placement, Set 2, Set 3) with date of assessment in relevant box to indicate student’s level(s) of achievement.

LevelListeningSpeakingReadingWriting
A1.1    
A1.2    
A1.3    
     
A2.1    
A2.2    
A2.3    
     
B1.1    
B1.2    
B1.3    

Placement Tests

The set of tests for Placement is intended for use within the first month of a student’s arrival in school. This set does not include specific curriculum learning but assumes general awareness of school and school subjects. The focus of this set of tests is on Personal Identification, Classroom Interaction and Learning how to Learn.

Listening

Notes for teachers

  • The test tasks are based on recordings, which can be found by clicking the link below.
  • A number of the tasks are presented as conversations or readings.
  • Each test is introduced by an example which appears on the answer sheet.
  • It is appropriate for the teacher to indicate how the sample question has been answered (e.g. by drawing a line, circling the correct answer etc.)
  • No other assistance should be provided during the test.
  • The teacher may end the test when it is evident that a student is no longer able to continue.
  • In the test for Listening at Level B1 (iii) the concept of ‘smiley faces’ is used. Teachers should confirm that students are familiar with this means of indicating negative, neutral and positive feelings or views.

Audio files—Listening

Tests—Listening

Correction Key Responses—Listening

Scoring and Rating—Listening

Speaking

Notes for teachers

  • All levels of this test are based on the pictures, which can be found in the link below.
  • The question prompts for teachers are provided as an integral part of the test.
  • Teachers should restrict interaction to the prompts provided.
  • It is important that the teacher familiarises him/herself with the descriptors contained in the grid at the top of each test in advance of administering the test.
  • Level A1 is marked in relation to Vocabulary and Pronunciation.
  • Levels A2 and B1 are marked in relation to Vocabulary, Grammar and Pronunciation.
  • If a teacher feels uncertain about carrying out the test while scoring the students’ performance at the same time, it would be appropriate, where possible, to use the assistance of another teacher, or to record the test for scoring afterwards.
  • The timing of these tests is determined by strict adherence to the prompts provided.
  • If a student has obvious difficulty responding, then the test should end at that point. The student’s current level of proficiency may be taken as the point at which he/she was unable to answer two or more questions in succession.

Pictures for Speaking Test—Speaking

Test—Speaking

Scoring and Rating—Speaking

Reading

Notes for teachers

  • The instructions for each task are indicated on the assessment sheet.
  • An example is provided on each sheet.
  • At level B1 all three tests are based on the three texts, which are introduced for the test B1 (i).
  • If necessary, teachers may provide support (non-verbal or verbal) in order to ensure that students understand fully the requirements of each stage. For example, the teacher may hold up a test sheet and indicate the sample answer.
  • No additional help should be given, as the purpose of the test is to determine the student’s ability to read the assessment tasks.
  • There is no strict time guideline for the reading assessment as the time taken by students may vary. However, teachers should observe the progress of students through the tests and allow similar time for completion as for a native-speaking group of students.
  • The teacher may end the test when it is evident that a student is no longer able to continue.

Test—Reading

Correction Key Responses—Reading

Scoring and Rating—Reading

Writing

Notes for teachers

  • At levels A1 and A2 assessment is based on picture prompts.
  • An example is provided on each A1 and A2 sheet.
  • If necessary, teachers may provide support (non-verbal or verbal) in order to ensure that students understand fully the requirements of each stage. For example, the teacher may hold up a test sheet, indicate the sample answer and indicate that the student should write his/her answers on the blank lines provided.
  • At level B1 the test requires free writing.
  • At Levels A2(ii) and B1 scoring is carried out in relation to descriptors for Writing at these levels.

Test—Writing

Correction Key Responses—Writing

Scoring and Rating—Writing

Set 2

The focus of this set of tests is on the following subjects; Physical Education, Art, Music, Home Economics, Technology, MTW, Technical Grahics. The tests also refer to Personal Identification, Classroom Interaction and Transition Year activities.

Listening

Note for teachers

  • The test tasks are based on recordings, which can be found by clicking the link below.
  • A number of the tasks are presented as conversations or readings.
  • Each test is introduced by an example which appears on the answer sheet.
  • It is appropriate for the teacher to indicate how the sample question has been answered (e.g. by drawing a line, circling the correct answer etc.)
  • No other assistance should be provided.
  • The teacher may end the test when it is evident that a student is no longer able to continue.
  • In the test for Listening at Level B1 (iii) the concept of ‘smiley faces’ is used. Teachers should confirm that students are familiar with this means of indicating negative, neutral and positive feelings or views.

Audio files—Listening (Files not available)

Tests—Listening

Correction Key Responses—Listening

Scoring and Rating—Listening

Speaking

Notes for teachers

  • All levels of this test are based on the pictures, which can be found in the link below.
  • The question prompts for teachers are provided as an integral part of the test.
  • Teachers should restrict interaction to the prompts provided.
  • It is important that the teacher familiarises him/herself with the descriptors contained in the grid at the top of each test in advance of administering the test.
  • Level A1 is marked in relation to Vocabulary and Pronunciation.
  • Levels A2 and B1 are marked in relation to Vocabulary, Grammar and Pronunciation.
  • If a teacher feels uncertain about carrying out the test while scoring the student’s performance at the same time, it would be appropriate, where possible, to use the assistance of another teacher, or to record the test for scoring afterwards.
  • The timing of these tests is determined by strict adherence to the prompts provided.
  • If a student has obvious difficulty responding, then the test should end at that point. The student’s current level of proficiency may be taken as the point at which he/she was unable to answer two or more questions in succession.

Pictures for Speaking Test—Speaking

Test—Speaking

Scoring and Rating—Speaking

Reading

Notes for teachers

  • The instructions for each task are indicated on the assessment sheet.
  • An example is provided on each sheet.
  • At level B1 all three tests are based on the three texts which are introduced for the test B1 (i).
  • If necessary, teachers may provide support (non-verbal or verbal) in order to ensure that students understand fully the requirements of each stage. For example, the teacher may hold up a test sheet and indicate the sample answer.
  • No additional help should be given, as the purpose of the test is to determine the student’s ability to read the assessment tasks.
  • There is no strict time guideline for the reading assessment as the time taken by students may vary. However, teachers should observe the progress of students through the tests and allow similar time for completion as for a native-speaking group of students.
  • The teacher may end the test when it is evident that a student is no longer able to continue.

Test—Reading

Correction Key Responses—Reading

Scoring and Rating—Reading

Writing

Notes for teachers

  • At levels A1 and A2 assessment is based on picture prompts.
  • An example is provided on each A1 and A2 sheet.
  • If necessary, teachers may provide support (non-verbal or verbal) in order to ensure that students understand fully the requirements of each stage. For example, the teacher may hold up a test sheet, indicate the sample answer and indicate that the student should write his/her answers on the blank lines provided.
  • At level B1 the test requires free writing.
  • At Levels A2(ii) and B1 scoring is carried out in relation to descriptors for writing at these levels.

Test—Writing

Correction Key Responses—Writing

Scoring and Rating—Writing

Set 3

The focus of this set of tests is on the demands of the English curriculum including reference to a range of different genres. Personal Identification and Classroom Interaction are also included.

Listening

Notes for teachers

  • The test tasks are based on recordings, which can be found by clicking the link below.
  • A number of the tasks are presented as conversations or readings.
  • Each test is introduced by an example which appears on the answer sheet.
  • It is appropriate for the teacher to indicate how the sample question has been answered (e.g. by drawing a line, circling the correct answer etc.)
  • No other assistance should be provided.
  • The teacher may end the test when it is evident that a student is no longer able to continue.
  • The test for Listening at Level B1 (iii) uses the symbols + ? - .

+ indicates agreement with the statement or a positive response

? indicates uncertainty (not sure, maybe, might)

- indicates a negative response

Audio files—Listening (Files not available)

Tests—Listening

Correction Key Responses—Listening

Scoring and Rating—Listening

Speaking

Notes for teachers

  • All levels of this test are based on the pictures, which can be found in the link below.
  • The question prompts for teachers are provided as an integral part of the test.
  • Teachers should restrict interaction to the prompts provided.
  • It is important that the teacher familiarises him/herself with the descriptors contained in the grid at the top of each test in advance of administering the test.
  • Level A1 is marked in relation to Vocabulary and Pronunciation.
  • Levels A2 and B1 are marked in relation to Vocabulary, Grammar and Pronunciation.
  • If a teacher feels uncertain about carrying out the test while scoring the student’s performance at the same time, it would be appropriate, where possible, to use the assistance of another teacher, or to record the test for scoring afterwards.
  • The timing of these tests is determined by strict adherence to the prompts provided.
  • If a student has obvious difficulty responding, then the test should end at that point. The student’s current level of proficiency may be taken as the point at which he/she was unable to answer two or more questions in succession.

Pictures for Speaking Test—Speaking

Test—Speaking

Scoring and Rating—Speaking

Reading

Notes for teachers

  • The instructions for each task are indicated on the assessment sheet.
  • An example is provided on each sheet.
  • At level B1 all three tests are based on the three texts which are introduced for the test B1 (i).
  • If necessary, teachers may provide support (non-verbal or verbal) in order to ensure that students understand fully the requirements of each stage. For example, the teacher may hold up a test sheet and indicate the sample answer.
  • No additional help should be given, as the purpose of the test is to determine the student’s ability to read the assessment tasks.
  • There is no strict time guideline for the reading assessment as the time taken by students may vary. However, teachers should observe the progress of students through the tests and allow similar time for completion as for a native-speaking group of students.
  • The teacher may end the test when it is evident that a student is no longer able to continue.

Test—Reading

Correction Key Responses—Reading

Scoring and Rating—Reading

Writing

Notes for teachers

  • At levels A1 and A2 assessment is based on picture prompts.
  • An example is provided on each A1 and A2 sheet.
  • If necessary, teachers may provide support (non-verbal or verbal) in order to ensure that students understand fully the requirements of each stage. For example, the teacher may hold up a test sheet, indicate the sample answer and indicate that the student should write his/her answers on the blank lines provided.
  • At level B1 the test requires free writing.
  • At Levels A2(ii) and B1 scoring is carried out in relation to descriptors for writing at these levels.

Test—Writing

Correction Key Responses—Writing

Scoring and Rating—Writing