Inclusion - Intercultural Education

 

Overview

Intercultural Education has two focal points:

  • It celebrates and recognises the normality of diversity in all areas of human life and sensitises the learner to the idea that humans have naturally developed a range of different ways of life, customs and worldviews, and that this breadth of human life enriches all of us.
  • It promotes equality and human rights and challenges unfair discrimination.

The Primary School Curriculum supports the principles of intercultural education. The vision, aims and principles of the curriculum provide a suitable framework for the development of an intercultural approach to teaching and learning.

The aims of the Junior Certificate programme are supportive of intercultural education and two of the aims relate specifically to aspects of intercultural education

  • to contribute to the moral and spiritual development of the young person and to develop a tolerance and respect for the values and beliefs of others
  • to prepare the young person for the responsibilities of citizenship in the national context and in the context of the wider European and global communities.

Rationale

Education not only reflects society but also influences its development. As such, schools have a role to play in the development of an intercultural society. While education cannot bear the sole responsibility for challenging racism and promoting intercultural competence, it has an important contribution to make in the development of the child’s intercultural skills, attitudes, values and knowledge. An intercultural education is valuable to all children in equipping them to participate in an increasingly diverse society.

Intercultural Education in the Primary School

The NCCA has developed Intercultural Education in the Primary School, Guidelines for Schools( 2006 )This document provides guidance for teachers and school management on:

  • mediating the curriculum in a way that reflects cultural diversity
  • making the curriculum as accessible as possible for children from ethnic minority groups
  • enhancing the intercultural experience of all pupils
  • creating an inclusive school culture.

The guidelines are designed to provide information for teachers and schools on ethnic and cultural diversity, racism and intercultural education as well as a practical resource that teachers can use in their everyday planning and teaching. It includes a range of exemplars based on classroom practice showing how to use an intercultural approach in all curriculum areas and a comprehensive resource list for teachers to access further information and teaching resources.

Intercultural Education in the Post-Primary School

The NCCA has developed Intercultural Education in the Post-Primary School, Guidelines for Schools (2006). These guidelines provide guidance for teachers and school management on:

  • mediating the curriculum in a way that reflects cultural diversity
  • making the curriculum as accessible as possible for children from ethnic minority groups
  • enhancing the intercultural experience of all pupils
  • creating an inclusive school culture.

The guidelines are designed to provide information for teachers and schools on ethnic and cultural diversity, racism and intercultural education as well as a practical resource that teachers can use in their everyday planning and teaching. It includes a range of exemplars based on classroom practice showing how to use an intercultural approach in a wide range of Junior Certificate subjects and a comprehensive resource list for teachers to access further information and teaching resources.

Publications

Intercultural Education in the Primary School:Guidelines for Schools (2004)
Intercultural Education in the Post-Primary School:Guidelines for Schools
(2006)
Intercultural Education: every teacher has a role
Article from info@ncca, edition 8, January 2008